‘First, but not last’: Black sororities, young girls celebrate representation of VP Kamala Harris

Millions of young girls watched Wednesday as Kamala Harris became the first woman, first African-American and first Asian-American vice president of the U.S.

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — Millions of young girls watched Wednesday as Kamala Harris became the first woman, first African-American and first Asian-American vice president of the United States.

Parents capturing the priceless moments of their daughters, watching as VP Harris was inaugurated.

“I am a member of the same sorority that VP Kamala Harris is, so it was very exciting for me and the hundreds of thousands of women who are members of Alpha Kappa Alpha,” Dr. Doze Y Butler said.

Dr. Butler is a dean at UAPB. Members of the Alpha Kappa Alpha chapter there wore pink and pearls Wednesday to honor Harris.

The historically Black sorority also declared January 20 “Kamala D. Harris Day.”

“This is the kind of day where you will remember where you were. We will remember that we all rocked our pearls today,” Dr. Butler said.

Many young girls also dressed up, excited to see someone that looks like them in one of the nation’s highest seats.

“People have sent me pictures of their daughters and their neighbors, little girls, five, six, seven, eight years old. Having on pearls with their outfits because even young girls realize how historic this moment is,” Dr. Butler said.

The vice president is an inspiration to young black boys, too. Harris is a graduate of Howard University… an all Black university in Washington D.C. 

Dr. Butler said Harris is proof you don’t need to attend an Ivy league to make it to the top; you just need to work hard.

“You can make it happen. You have the tools to make it happen,” Dr. Butler said.

Dr. Butler feels this day is only the beginning of change in America.

“As she said, she’s the first, but she definitely won’t be the last. So, that is the message, that they can too grow up to be Vice President of the  United States or whatever they want to become,” Dr. Butler said.